Voting record for controversial assembly vote is a goner.

Published: August 6, 2009

Maybe once or twice you hold your nose –  but 71 times in the last 6 years? When you see the scary crap that already comes out of Sacramento, one can only imagine the depravity of bills that merit total expungement from the record.

Like maybe a Democrat voting FOR off-shore drilling?

If the Republicans had been able to pull this off, we still wouldn’t know which members voted FOR taxes last budget go-round.

Is it any wonder most people don’t trust politicians as far as they can hurl them.

The following news story appeared in the Los Angeles Times on August 6, 2009:

California Assembly expunges votes on oil drilling bill

By Patrick McGreevy Reporting from Sacramento — Although 28 members of the California Assembly supported a measure to allow new oil drilling off the Santa
Barbara coast, their votes are nowhere to be found in the official state database.

After the measure failed, Assembly leaders expunged the vote altogether, sparing lawmakers running for reelection an official record of
their controversial decision. The voting logs made available to the public on the Legislature’s website do not indicate who voted for and against the
controversial bill on July 24.
One critic calls it ‘a legislative coverup.’

It wasn’t the first time the Assembly has done this. The little-known practice of purging votes, which experts say serves little purpose
other than to allow lawmakers to hide actions from the public, is quite common in the lower house, legislative records show. In the last six years, 71
votes on bills in the Assembly have been cleansed from the record.

“The message to the public is ‘this vote was an inconvenient vote and we would rather you not look at the man behind the curtain,’ “said Assemblyman Chuck DeVore (R-Irvine), who wrote the oil drilling bill.

Read the rest of this story at:

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-purge6-2009aug06,0,1598055.story


Last modified: August 6, 2009 at 4:12 pm | Originally published: August 6, 2009 at 4:12 pm
Printed: September 28, 2020